The Magical Realism of Colombian Adoptees By Leslie Whitaker and Craig Askinazi

The Magical Realism of Colombian Adoptees By Leslie Whitaker and Craig Askinazi

What is it like to have been adopted from Colombia in the late 1970s and raised in the US? The answer of course will vary for everyone, but there are some things most of us have in common…

Extra-complicated search and reunions. The geographical and cultural divide of continents, corruption, language, governments, laws, DNA tests, and often inter-married families collude to make the search and reunion of adoptees with their Colombian families quite challenging. Often, when trying to put together a family tree, it becomes apparent that due to the above complexities, this task is not easy and may come with more questions than answers.

Growing up with a stigma. Although the height of infamous Colombian cartel wars and kidnappings have long since passed their peak, from the late-70s to mid-90s corruption was at its height. During this era, many babies and young children were kidnapped and trafficked for adoption revenue, adding layers of stigma and further complicating searches for some adoptees. The notorious reputation of such lives on in the assumptions and impressions that many outsiders have of modern Colombian life. This is not to say that danger or violence no longer exists there, but those statistics are now far below that of many American cities. Unfortunately, these stereotypes are often still thrust upon Colombian adoptees in the media and tend to arise in casual conversation when discussing our backgrounds.

Forming connections. Despite the obstacles, many of us have found ways to connect with one another and our inner selves to hone a stronger sense of identity. We have formed Meetup, Facebook, Clubhouse, and support groups to connect with one another and share encouragement, tips, and advice. Many of us relate to our adoptions via our professions including authoring books, hosting podcasts, and creating visual art. Others are often therapists or legal advocates. Naturally, our interests and occupations run the gamut, but unifying us at the core is our exceptional resilience.

It can be so uplifting to seek the support of other people like ourselves to stand in as cultural mirrors, help support the process of searching for biological family, or simply to help us feel more at peace with ourselves.

There is power in numbers, and connecting with other Colombian adoptees (or any group one identifies with) can be invaluable to satisfying the human quest to feel heard and understood.

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PSA: It’s Colombia, not Columbia!

READ AND LEARN MORE about  Colombian Adoptee Support and Discussion Groups. CLICK HERE FOR HANDOUT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Adoption Conference – Virtual – November 2020 Organized During a Pandemic!!!

National Adoption Conference – Virtual – November 2020 Organized During a Pandemic!!!

National Adoption Conference was held virtually on WHOVA in 2020

This conference took place on Friday, November 14-15, 2020. Celia Center sponsored this conference and 250 people attended virtually. 

The National Adoption Conference is a groundbreaking two days of education, training, networking and invaluable resources for all members of the adoption and foster care ‘constellation’. Taking full advantage of an entirely ‘virtual’ conference, we will bring you face to face with some of the Nation’s leading experts and visionaries in the field as well as live music, entertainment, coffee talk, Q&A’s, diverse exhibitors and even an art gallery to explore. 

Web access available for all sessions, films, and music for 6 months AFTER the conference through May 13, 2021. PURCHASE ACCESS HERE

This event is for First Birth Mothers and Fathers, Adoptees, Foster Youth Alumni, Foster Parents, Adoptive Parents, Siblings, and Extended Family Members, Social Workers, Psychotherapists, Teachers, and Doctors. 

Full Conference details HERE 


The goals of the conference were threefold:

  • To provide insight, education and resources for people involved in any aspect of the adoption | foster care constellation so that they may find trustworthy and immediate mental, physical or emotional assistance.
  • To begin an on-going and transparent conversation around how this Nation approaches, administers and discusses issues regarding foster care and adoption.
  • To challenge the old and largely inaccurate negative stigmas surrounding foster care and adoption and create a new shared language that champions openness, challenges labels and prejudice and creates an atmosphere of love and normalcy around non-traditional families.

Sessions Presented were as follows:

 

 

 

Why Won’t My Natural Mother Meet Me? by Carole Anderson, A First Mother’s Voice.. Still Speaks To US!

Why Won’t My Natural Mother Meet Me? by Carole Anderson, A First Mother’s Voice.. Still Speaks To US!

Carole J. Anderson, died March 31, 2003, after an extended illness of cancer. After graduating from college, Carole received a master’s degree in social work and then went on to attend law school. She later served as clerk for a Justice of the Iowa Supreme Court. Carole was a leader in the field of adoption reform, serving as National President of Concerned United Birthparents for many years. 


May she rest in peace, knowing we are still listening and feeling her heart-sent message.

Why did your birth mother refuse to meet you? Carole explains….

There are probably as many answers as there are birth mothers. From some of my own feelings and those of other birth mothers, though, I do have a few possible themes to suggest. Maybe some of the possibilities are behind your birth mother’s refusal to meet you….

  • Your birth mother lost a great deal when she surrendered you.
  • She lost the chance to give you all of the love she felt for you, that all mothers feel.
  • She lost the opportunity to share in the important and the humdrum events of your life.
  • She lost all the joys and problems of raising you, of guiding you from infancy to adulthood.
  • She may feel guilty that she was not there.
  • She may feel cheated because she was not allowed to be there.

    Either way, loss is both painful and unnatural.

In addition to the pain of the losses themselves, there is the additional pain of feeling different from other people, outcast from society. Often there is the pain of feeling that the loss was unnecessary and that the separation need not have occurred “if only…”

…..If only her parents had helped her.
…..If only the social worker had told her what adoption would really be like for you and for her.
…..If only society had supported single parenthood at the time you were born.
…..If only she had not believed she was unworthy of you. If only she had had the money to support you.
…..If only she had somehow found a way to keep you.
…..If only she had believed in her own feelings instead of what others told her would be best for you.

       The list of “if onlies” is endless.

  • Knowing you could make her losses more real to her, and thus more painful.
  • She may have worked very hard at denying her feelings, at convincing herself that your adoption was necessary, at telling herself that giving birth does not make a woman a mother, at pretending that she was not a mother and so did not lose anything.
  • She may have denied to herself that it ever happened.

If she has succeeded at numbing herself to the pain by clinging to such beliefs, knowing you would remove the blinders from her eyes, exposing her to the full impact of all the years of loss and pain.

  • She may have coped with losing you through fantasizing about what might have been.
  • She may see you over and over in her mind just as you were when she last saw you, see herself raising you, see what you would be like at different ages.
  • If your birth mother has other children, she may be terrified of losing them, too, if she had not told them about you.
  • Many birth mothers were rejected by their children’s birth fathers and by their own parents during their pregnancies. If the people she loved and trusted and whom she though would always love and help abandoned her when she most needed them, she may be unable to trust anyone now.

    She may regard all relationships as fragile, and fear that she will be abandoned again if she disappoints the people who are now important to her. Having already suffered the pain of losing one child, the fear of losing her other children and suffering that same pain again may overwhelm her. She may also fear losing you a second time around, if you want to see her only once.

    Many birth mothers have internalized others’ rejection of them and believe they are unlovable. Not loving or respecting herself, she cannot believe that others could care about her if they really knew her.

  • Suspecting that adoptees who search will ask about their fathers after they have satisfied their curiosity about their mothers, her rejection may be tied to her feelings about your birth father. If she loved him, accepting you could mean reopening the deep wounds she suffered in being rejected by him. IF she did not love him, she may dread having to admit that fact to you.
  • She may not want to explain her relationship with your birth father or her feelings about it, and fear that you will reject her if she does not answer your questions about him. She may fear that you would prefer him to her and she could not bear to lose you to the very person whose abandonment made your surrender unavoidable. She may believe that your birth father is a terrible person and feel shame at having had a relation with him, fear that you hat her if you knew him. She may fear that you would be upset! or would think less of her or of yourself if you knew him.

Mothers want their children to be happy, but they also want to feel needed and important to their children. They want to be the ones who make their children happy. Generally, a mother’s needs and her child’s compliment each other, so that both are satisfied by her raising her child, with each needing and receiving the other’s love. The special situation of adoption, though, assures that the birth mother cannot win.

…..If she believes your adoption was the best for you, she may feel worthless or useless as a mother because you did not need her.

…..If your adoption was not the best, she may feel guilty that she did not protect you from whatever happened and she may therefore feel she failed as a mother and as a woman.

Your birth mother’s image of herself as a mother, a woman, and a human being may be at stake. If she has internalized society’s judgments that “nice girls don’t” or that only an “unnatural woman” could surrender her child or that “any animal can give birth but that doesn’t make her a mother”, it will be difficult for her to acknowledge to herself that it is she who is that bad girl, the unnatural woman, or only an animal in society’s eyes.

Subconsciously, some mothers feel that their babies abandoned them….

….Mothers were often repeatedly told that their babies needed or wanted more than they could give them, and that surrender was necessary for the child.

…..Many mothers were told that to keep their children would be selfish, that they had no right to satisfy their need to love and nurture by raising their children, because the children deserve and need more.

Other people spoke for you, telling your birth mother you wanted more than she could give. To your birth mother, this may have been experienced deep within as a rejection by you, as her baby’s deserting her for other people. Even though she knows on an intellectual level that this feeling is not rational and she may feel guilty for it, on an emotional level what she feels may be that, although she needed and wanted her child, her child was not there for her. 

Closely related are the problems of competition and sacrifice.

Just as she may have felt that she was in competition with unknown couples for the right to raise you, a contest in which she was the loser, she was also placed in the position of being in competition with you. She may have been told that it was her life or yours, her needs or yours. Because you were not aided as a family but instead treated as individuals whose needs were in conflict, she may have felt that she was choosing between her own happiness and yours.

If she wanted to raise you but believed that your surrender was necessary for you happiness, she may feel that she has sacrificed her life for yours, her happiness for yours. All people want happiness, everyone wants her own needs to be met, and there is usually anger toward injustice. She, however, cannot allow herself to feel or express her anger and resentment, because it was your birth mother herself who decided that you were more important and mattered more than she did, she herself who chose your needs above her own.

If that choice was made by others such as her parents or by her situation instead of by your birth mother, there may be even more anger. There can be tremendous guilt involved for feeling anger, because we have been taught that parents gladly sacrifice for their children. Her anger may therefore be threatening to her, for what kind of person can she be that she could feel anger toward her child?

Yet other parents, other people, do not make sacrifices of this magnitude. What society usually calls parental sacrifice is really more like an investment or a trade-off of some current comfort in exchange for other regards. To give up a full night’s sleep in order to tend a sick child carries with it the benefits of holding and comforting that child, feeling necessary to the child, receiving the child’s love and gaining society’s approval. What most parents think of as sacrifices are small and temporary inconveniences for which they receive personal satisfaction, the child’s loyalty and affection and societal sanctions. The sacrifice of a birth mother’s life for her child’s in unique.

Rather than compensations, the sacrifice is generally answered with guilt, pain and emptiness. Society’s reaction is most often condemnation rather than approval. The birth mother’s sacrifice is unnatural, unrecognized and unrewarded.

Some birth mothers felt less than human during the pregnancy and surrender experience, and may have felt they were regarded as subhuman by society. Just as infants have a need to be nurtured, so every mother has a need to give nurture to her child. You were placed with people who could meet your infant need for nurture, but your birth mother was given no substitute for you. Her need to nurture was not met.

Understandably, many adoptees explain that their adoptive parents are their only real parents and they love them dearly, but that they searched to gain information about themselves. Newspapers are full of articles about adoptees saying that they are not looking for a mother, but for themselves or their own identity.

Your birth mother may feel she is again being reduced to a data bank. Just as she once surrendered you to others while her own needs went unmet, she may feel she is now being asked for information but that again her feelings and needs will be ignored.

She may feel she has given everything without receiving anything in return, and will be reluctant to give still more if she fears that you too, will take what you want from her and then abandon her with no thought for her needs.

Even if she is able to struggle through the many pains and losses that have already occurred, your birth mother may fear that there are more to come if she accepts you now. It may hurt her terribly that she could not mother you.

          Opening her heart to you would make your birth mother vulnerable to a later rejection by you.

  • If she welcomed you as the beloved daughter or son she lost, how would she feel at being only a friend or acquaintance to you?
  • To what extent would you accept her? Would she be asked to your graduation or wedding?
  • Would you want to spend Christmas or Passover with her?
  • Would you regard her as the grandmother of your children, including her in events in their lives?
  • Or would you want to see her on rare and secret occasions, carefully hiding the relationship from others?
  • She may feel that not only have adoptive parents taken her place in your life as a child and in raising you, but that by accepting you now she would lose you again, this time by inches, by being relegated to a lowly and insignificant place in your life, if she were included at all….

    As an adult, you are unlikely to want your birth mother to be the mother she may, on some level, still want to be.

    Your image of motherhood will always be that of your adoptive mother, not your birth mother. You cannot relate to your birth mother in the same way you would have if she had raised you, nor can she relate to you in the same way. Neither of you are the people you would be if she had raised you. Although the similarities you are likely to share would make her keenly aware that you are her child, the differences resulting from your growing up in your adoptive home would make her painfully aware of the distance between you as well.

Because meeting you requires facing all her feelings about your surrender and loss, it may also challenge your birth mother’s beliefs about the value and meaning of life, the importance of family ties, religion and other basic concepts on which she has built her life. Many people want to believe that the world is fair, that everything comes out even, that people get what they deserve out of life. Adoption issues do not fit into such tidy categories.

.…If the world is fair, what has she done that is so terrible she deserve such pain?
….If life is equal why did other people who expressed their sexuality before marriage pay not price for it?
…..If this is justice why did her subsequent children have to grow up in an incomplete family, without their brother or sister.
…..IF families are of primary importance and should be kept together why was her family separated?

How could her church have told her God wanted her child to be adopted or that God created her child for other parents?
How could a loving God want this pain for her?

….If she allows herself to acknowledge her experience, how can she reconcile it with what she believes about life?
….If the foundations on which she has build her life do not match her experience, it will be difficult for her to face her feelings and risk losing those foundations.


Facing you may mean reconstructing! her entire view of life, rethinking all of her values.
The issues a birth mother must face before she can accept her adult child are not simple ones, nor are they obvious to her.

Often there are conflicts between what she thinks and what she feels or between her feelings and those of the people around her. Few birth mothers were told to expect these problems or prepared to deal with them. Since little or no hope of a future reunion was offered to surrendering mothers, there was little motivation for attempting to deal with them. Many were told that they would be abnormal if they did not forget about their children, that they should go on with their lives as if they had never had their children.

Most birth mothers, despite the enormity of these issues, do face most of them in the years following surrender. Most people cannot sustain the fantasy that their loss was a nightmare and not a reality. Most people find the strength to face the truth of their own lives, but growth can be a slow and painful process with uneven progress characterized by temporary regression back to suppressed feelings.

To some people, it might seem pointless to attempt reunions when so much pain, conflict and confusion seem to be involved. Reunion, though, does not cause these difficulties. Their source is the birth mother’s unnatural separation from her child. The feelings already exist, and leaving them buried beneath denials and fantasies cannot resolve or eliminate them. However painful the separation experience may be, it is her experience, her life. Attempting to suppress the most profound experience of her life separates the birth mother from herself as well as from her child and is not healthy for anyone. It requires that much emotional energy be spent on denying or numbing feelings, limiting emotional growth in all areas.

Your birth mother’s fear and dread are evidence of the intensity of her feelings for you. If she had no feeling for you, you would be no more frightening to her than a store clerk or a stranger asking for directions.

What she feels may be an overwhelmingly intense but undifferentiated fear and she herself may not understand the reasons for it. Her reasons are her deepest emotions, hidden under so may layers of intellect, rationalization and denial that she is unaware of them. She may try to give sensible reasons why she cannot see, understand or articulate the real reasons without much self analysis.

.….You are offering the opportunity for your birth mother to grow by facing herself and becoming reconciled with her feelings about herself.

…..You are offering the gift of knowing the person her surrendered child has become. These are enormous gifts and you should be proud for offering them to her.

In order to accept them, though, your birth mother must climb a painfully steep and rocky path through her many feelings about your surrender before she can move forward to reconciliation. Her ability to walk a part of that path or all of it is not a reflection on you or on your worth or on your importance to her but on how well she herself can deal with the fears and pains that your loss and society’s attitudes about the surrender have caused her.

….With time and support your birth mother may grow to accept the gifts you offer.

by Carole Anderson

Copyright 1982 by Concerned United Birthparents, Inc.

Foster Parent Poem…

Foster Parent Poem…

There I sat, alone and afraid,

You got a call and came right to my aid.

You bundled me up with blankets and love.

And, when I needed it most, you gave me a hug.

I learned that the world is not all that scary and cold.

That sometimes there is someone to have and to hold.

You taught me what love is, you helped me to mend.

You loved me and healed me and became my first friend.

And just when I thought you’d done all you do,

There came along not one new lesson, but two.

First, you said, “Sweetheart, you’re ready to go.

I’ve done all I can, and you’ve learned all I know”

Then you bundled me up with a blanket and a kiss.

Along came a new family, they even have kids!

They took me to their home, forever to stay.

At first, I thought you sent me away.

Then that second lesson became perfectly clear.

No matter how far, you will always be near.

And so, Foster Mom, you know I’ve moved on.

I have a new home, with toys and a lawn.

But I’ll never forget what I learned that first day.

You never really give your fosters away.

You gave me these thoughts to remember you by.

We may never meet again, and now I know why.

You’ll remember I lived with you for a time.

I may not be yours, but you’ll always be mine.

–Author Unknown

 

Celia Center Support Group featured on TV Series LONG LOST FAMILY TLC Channel — Viewed 238,496 times on YouTube!

Celia Center Support Group featured on TV Series LONG LOST FAMILY TLC Channel — Viewed 238,496 times on YouTube!

The producers of Long Lost Family contacted Jeanette Yoffe, Founder of Celia Center to support a woman, Joanne, who found her birth father. Joanne wanted to join a local support group, to learn how to build a relationship with her long lost father, and balance her relationship with her step-father.

Watch and see how members of Adoption Constellation supported Joanne in Los Angeles on June 8, 2016.

Celia Center Adoption Constellation Support Group Community helps Joanne navigate a reunion with her birth father. Support Group facilitated
by Founder, Jeanette Yoffe M.F.T.

Celia Center Support Group is on OWN Television

Celia Center Support Group is on OWN Television

logo and photo of woman with small child

Celia Center was approached by OWN Television about their new show Raising Whitley.
It is a  

Kym needed advice upon meeting with her foster-adoptive son’s birth mother. Watch as the Celia Center Community and Founder, Jeanette Yoffe support her on her journey.

WATCH MORE EPISODES HERE

Adoption Discussions Radio Interview Part I & II

Jeanette Yoffe was interviewed by Donna Montalbano for Adoption Discussions, WOON Rhode Island Radio about adoption and healing, helping Foster & Adoptive Families in Los Angeles. Click here to listen or download Part I... Click here to listen or...